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How to Deep Clean Your New House Before Moving In

A person with a cleaning cloth in protective gloves showing how to deep clean your new house.

It’s incredible how such a wonderful thing as buying a new home is followed by a mood-dampening task like deep cleaning! There’s no way to avoid it entirely unless you hire professional cleaners. No matter how well previous owners maintained and cleaned the home before the sale, it has been frequented during moving out. Thus, the best you can do is to deep clean your new house before moving in and unpack your boxes in a fresh and tidy home. What better way to start your new life?

Take a very good look at your new house

More often than not, new homeowners decide to remodel their new house before moving in. A (mostly) empty home makes for an excellent opportunity to renovate and apply a personal touch. If you haven’t arranged for a home inspection before purchase, which we strongly advise, the time before moving in provides the ultimate chance to do so. Inspect your new house, apply all the fixes, structural and cosmetic alike, and ensure your peace of mind before you start to clean.

You’re undoubtedly aware that deep cleaning after home renovation or construction is necessary, and truth be told, it is much easier if experienced professionals handle it from start to finish. It is simply because post-construction or deep cleaning doesn’t include the washing and tidying only but choosing the right type and amount of cleaning supplies, the right procedures to not damage anything on your new home as well as waste disposal of some material. Moreover, it takes homeowners significant time and effort to safely clean hard stains and remove the voluminous and heavy pieces of rubbish. It is something that experts are trained to do quickly and with ease.

Before the cleaning commences 

Keep in mind that it is vital to stay protected on moving day but also before, during cleaning, and after, during unpacking. Hence, take time to explore all the ways to avoid mishaps and ensure safety for yourself, your helpers, and your belongings. Ideally, you’d look for a local company offering cleaning services but even then, make sure they are licensed as well and insured and bonded. That way, you don’t have to worry about possible injuries and damage to your property.

Prepare to deep clean your new house

Every project has a few golden rules, and cleaning is not an exception. Preparation involves a quick evaluation of all the areas that need to be cleaned, indoors and outdoors. It is most likely that the previous owners have arranged for cleaning before an open house and that you won’t have much to do. If that is not the case, make sure you

  • acquire all the necessary cleaning supplies and tools in adequate amounts,
  • set up a cleaning order,
  • clean in phases.

Each one of these steps serves an important purpose. If you obtain everything you need initially, there’s no need to leave your home until you finish. Start with the furthest room, move to the front, and always clean from the ceiling to the floor. That way, you won’t spread the dirt to the clean rooms and surfaces. It will also allow you to take a break, rest, and then pick up cleaning right where you had left off.

How and what to clean?

Now that you’re familiar with preparatory tasks, cleaning is in order. The good news is, if you get ready for the chores, the rest will go smoothly. The world wide web is full of excellent advice on how to clean particular surfaces, including cleaning checklists. But rarely will you find the tips that tell you what to focus on. With that in mind, when you set out to deep clean your new house, bear in mind the following.

Bathroom

While your bathroom may look sturdy with all the marble and ceramics, note that you’ll require non-abrasive sponges and special chemicals for those surfaces, especially if you need to scrub a newly glazed tub.

Organize your cleaning tasks to eliminate idling. In other words, spray a cleaning chemical over dirty surface and while it works, clean something else. Sometimes, you might need to leave the chemicals overnight, so plan well.

Living room and bedrooms

Washing heavy curtains and cleaning carpets and upholstered furniture present the most significant challenge during deep cleaning, especially if the previous owners had pets. Professional cleaning once again saves the day for a very simple reason. Cleaning appliances most people own are designed for daily use that excludes strong vacuuming power, washing, and vacuuming option, as well as steam cleaning.

If you ever stop and start wondering if you forgot to clean something, you most likely did. And you’re likely to overlook the most obvious things: doorknobs, cabinet handles, and light switches. It is natural to focus on large surfaces, hidden spots, nooks, and crannies. However, the elements that require the most attention during deep cleaning are not that deeply hidden at all.

Kitchen

Next to the bathroom, the kitchen is the most demanding room in the house as it sees the most use. The amount of grease, old stains, sticky and dirty areas can be overwhelming. The best course of action is to remove all parts that are not fixed to your cabinets and major appliances, clean the fixed sections first and then reattach clean elements. Make sure that every element is dry before you fix it back.

Pay attention to the vents, range hoods, and associated filters. They are easy to overlook but often are the dirtiest areas in the kitchen. Speaking of hidden areas, whenever possible, move the appliance or a cabinet away from the wall and vacuum behind. The dust and crumbs build up one can find there is remarkable.

The final swipe

As a bonus tip and considering the ongoing situation, think about investing in a coronavirus disinfection service. Having in mind numerous people who recently moved through your new home, disinfecting your house before moving in appears as a reasonable decision. To deep clean your new house may not be sufficient. A sanitized and disinfected home is what you want to unpack into.